Bravo Cura

Celebrating José Cura--Singer, Conductor, Director

 

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 More, more, more....

More from Russia--glorious photos from the Onegin Award / Gala.

More from Argentina -- another honor for Maestro Cura

More Tosca -- a collection from 2009 through 2012

And Andrea Chénier... the beginning of a great series of performances at Teatro Colón.

 


 

Congratulations to José Cura on his latest Recognition

 

 

José Cura will receive the title of Honorary Professor

Cura is world-renowned as one of the most important artists of this time.

The National University of Rosario (UNR) will award the title of Honorary Professor to Maestro José Cura. The Ceremony will take place on Thursday, November 16 at 11:45 in the University Cultural Space (ECU), San Martín 750.

The same day at 7:00 pm, in the Hall of Acts of the Faculty of Humanities and Arts of the UNR, Entre Ríos 758, the opera singer, composer and director José Cura will give a talk with the title: "Be yourself: Intellectual honesty may not pay off in the short term, but it leaves its mark in history. "

It is a meeting with the students of the School of Music and to which the general public can also attend; a space to exchange opinions, ask questions, and chat.

Note:  This is a machine-based translation.  We offer it only a a general guide but it should not be considered definitive.

 

 

 

Distinguished as "Honorary Professor" -- José Cura

The opera singer, composer and director, José Cura, received the title of "Honorary Professor" from the National University of Rosario (UNR) at the proposal of the School of Music of the Faculty of Humanities and Arts.

 The ceremony was held in the ECU (University Cultural Space) and culminated with a talk by Cura entitled "Be yourself: intellectual honesty may not pay in the short term, but it leaves its mark in history".

 The Maestro studied guitar, composition, piano, orchestra conducting and singing.  He has a prolific career in Rosario, Buenos Aires and Europe, where he achieved world fame having worked with some of the largest orchestras in the world, such as the London Philharmonia, London Symphony, Vienna Philharmonic, Warsaw Sinfonia, Toscanini Orchestra, among others.

Note:  This is a machine-based translation.  We offer it only a a general guide but it should not be considered definitive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Rector Héctor Floriani granted the appointment of Honorary Professor to Maestro José Luis Cura, in an act celebrated in the University Cultural Space (ECU).

The distinction was proposed by the Board of Directors of the Faculty of Humanities and Arts, the dean of the Faculty, José Goity, referred to the importance of the figure of José Cura, which he considers one of the main and most outstanding representatives of our country in the world.  He also highlighted the development of Cura at the National University of Rosario, which he considered as an affirmation of the public university as a model of education.

The new Honorary Professor was thankful for the recognition that he took as a great commitment to the institution.  Cura took advantage of the act to recognize the teachers who accompanied him in his musical training and as a person.  "Those who prosecuted him without killing his talent and passion."

José Luis Cura, was born in Rosario on December 5, 1962, and began his musical studies learning guitar with Juan di Lorenzo.  At age 15 he made his debut as a choral director.  The following year, he began to study composition with Carlos Castro, and piano with Zulma Cabrera.

In 1982, he began studying at the Art School of the UNR, the following year he was assistant director of the choir of the institution.  At age 21, he won a scholarship to study at the art school of the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires.  There he works for several years in the Choir, while studying composition and direction at the same time.

In 1991, José Cura settled in Europe, where he met the tenor Vittorio Terranova, under whose teachings he acquired his mastery in Italian opera style.

In the afternoon, Maestro Cura gave a talk for students of the School of Music of the UNR.

Note:  This is a machine-based translation.  We offer it only a a general guide but it should not be considered definitive.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Andrea Chénier

 

Balance.  José Cura opined that the past must be respected without it becoming "necrophilia."

 

 

Note:  This is a machine-based translation.

José Cura uses language with precision and purpose;  the computer does not.  

We offer it only a a rough guide to the conversation and the ideas exchanged but the following should not be considered definitive.

 

 

"Being famous became easy, the difficult thing is to be worthy of fame"

Singer, composer and director José Cura was honored this week by the UNR.

La Capital

Rodolfo Bella

18 November 2017

[Excerpt]

 Balance.  José Cura opined that the past must be respected without it becoming "necrophilia."

"When the prize is at home, the weight and responsibility are different," stated the Rosarian tenor, composer and director José Cura shortly before receiving the title of Honorary Professor from the National University of Rosario.  Settled for almost twenty years in Madrid and visiting his hometown where he had already been declared an Illustrious Citizen, Cura chatted with Escenario about his career, his projects and his work in some of the most prestigious theaters in the world.  Friendly and in a good mood, he said that classic art may please or not, but it requires "time" to enjoy something more than "the little song of every day" and that his style is characterized by "sincerity" and by trying satisfy neither "conservatives" nor "the new."  In a broad sense, he opted for a society in which "the love for the past, which must exist, does not turn into necrophilia, because then it is a defect, and the triumph of the new does not become a mockery of the past, because it is an error."

Q:  You’re an Illustrious Citizen and now Honorary Professor.  What do these distinctions mean to you?

José Cura: And the next mayor (laughs) The prize and the applause or recognition most difficult to achieve is always that of your brothers, that of your family. That has a double cut, the pleasure of feeling recognized and respected by your brothers and the commitment.   

Q:  How did you live in Rosario the first stage of your career?  What projections did you do then?

JC:  I believe that all young people, and I do not say it in the chronological sense, but include those who remain young at 80 because they live with projects in their heads, we have and we drag the eternal dream. You finish one and another comes and another.  But the arrival is almost less important than the journey.  It's all good, but when you start everything is like a romantic idealism.  Then there comes a time, after 50, and your idealism stops being romantic and you become more stoic and you play for something that is worth playing.  That is the difference, but idealism is only changing its face.

Q:  What is your assessment of the changes and transformations?

JC:  The crises serve to help you grow if you know how to capitalize or to sink you if you let them drag you down.  Obviously each generation has to fight with their own things, but until the 2000 and peak changed more than anything the modes with which we fought but the tools were basically the same. From the overwhelming force of technology that almost manages our lives, we had to learn a completely different set of codes. Some are very good and others are dangerous.  One of today's delicate risks with technology is that it can make you famous, something that was once part of a huge process and it happened if you really had something to tell.  It’s relatively simple if you know how to manage a means of communication or networks.  Now, because being famous has become easy, the difficult thing is not to be famous but to be great, worthy of fame.

Q:  Technology also invaded all areas, including music ...

JC:  It happens in newspapers especially ... Being able to take advantage of some of this for the distribution of music so that it reaches further and to more people would be a positive thing, although the negative for the industry is that at the business level of culture, there were transformations to the industries.  Where before a hundred people were needed to put a record on the street now you need one who presses a button.  However, the artistic creators are still the same, the singers, the orchestra, except in electronic music.  But the amount of people needed for that product to reach people is a thousand times lower and that creates a huge crisis at work in our industry.

Q: Why did you choose lyrical singing or not rock or another genre?

JC:  My training is as a composer and orchestra conductor, that's what I studied at the School of Music. The vocals came a little later.  Singing was a complementary subject at school and through that subject I discovered that I had certain aptitudes beyond singing in a choir.  But even now more than before, I continue to develop orchestral composition and direction.  Being a famous tenor helps people have some curiosity, now if it's a good or bad work or a piece of crap, however famous you are will continue to be, but at least opens a door (laughs).

Q: Does opera still have validity?

JC:  I always answer that with feet of lead.  The changes and the innovations at first helped and then we will see where we are going to stop. What scares me the most is the path the world is taking in climate, energy and war.  I am not one of those who say that the past is always better, but I think that we must continue with some things in classical art, with everything that has to do with beauty and that keeps man with his feet on the ground. But you also have to be careful that by having the most beautiful picture, you have a wall to put the painting on. That is to say, go on with everything but don’t forget the essential thing because we are going to have classic opera but we are not going to have a world.

Q:  What kind of opera could represent the current complexity of the world, not only with the climate crisis, but also with religious extremism or extreme political tensions?

JC:  The background of art closet in general has been to pull from and even were premonitory, or originally was taken from scandal that today are something ordinary.  For example, the gender violence that was already denounced by Shakespeare with "Otello" 500 years ago.

Q:  In what way did these historical, political and social events influence the emergence of other genres such as jazz, rock, blues?

 

 JC:  I'll say it in a culinary way: there is leaven and there is yeast and when there is yeast the dough grows.  From that you can draw all the analogies that come to you.  Whenever there are crises, things happen and in crises the opportunists are mixed, with the idealists, the dreamers, the dishonest.  We are all mixed up and will depend on what type of individual there is in the majority where everything is headed.

Q:  How do you live in the interpretation of the opera the fact that not hitting a half tone can generate a conflict or affect an entire production, something that does not create scandalize other genres?

JC:  It is a conflict that for me is positive.  The world is divided between conservatives and progressives, in broad strokes.  There are those who believe everything in the past was better and everything present is better until it smells a lot tomorrow, and then those who say "we can do something new."  I think both forces have to live together and it is good that they live together.  When everything is conservative we stay in the Paleolithic, but when everything is progress we lose roots.  It is the balance between the two that makes a good society.  But society is made by men and not by machines, then it adds an ingredient that is passion, more or less heat, defend ideas with more or less vehemence, and man is man because it is so.  One thing is that they fight with each other passionately with an idea of ​​wanting to do a good, and another is that if we coexist with that we do not feel sunk by the fight but we feel stimulated because for me it's great that a guy wants to pull forward as someone else wants to balance.  I never thought that a very serious issue.  The only thing that seems sad, but is also part of the nature of man, is when they want to be right, they start insulting or mistreating.  In that sense today more damage is done than before because we have the great alibi that gives us anonymity.  Today we can shoot like snipers without anyone knowing who we are.  That complicates the situation because it has transformed an old issue like the world into an act of cowardice that hurts, and that does not work.

Q:  How would you define your style?

JC:  My style has always been characterized by sincerity. When I do something, I truly believe in what I am doing. I do not make it old so that the conservatives are happy nor do I make it modern for the rest.  I do it as my sincerity tells me that I have to do it and then conclusions will be drawn.  When you see a show, whether I wrote it, directed it or sang it, what you will see is something that I truly believe in it.  I think the basis of success is also that because people can argue if Aida arrives on a motorcycle or on a camel, they are details and a discussion until tender, what is serious is when it arrives in one thing or another, what is seen betrays the lack of conviction of the creator.  There everything goes to the devil.  The progressive is so negative that he progresses only because he does not like anything that looks like the conservative who keeps doing it only for fear that nothing will destroy what has already been done.  Both things are negative.  I believe that sincerity is the most important word.  And the key word is originality.  Originality is a great word because it speaks of origin, sources, birth, root, but also has a connotation of the future, is something original, new.  In the same word in which both conservative and progressive can exist.  And if they can coexist in a word why won’t they be able to coexist in society? A society in which the love for the past, which has to exist, does not turn into necrophilia because then it is a defect.  And the triumph of the new does not become a mockery of the past because it is a mistake.  This applies to all behaviors of the human being, from the technological, to the artistic, family.

Q: Was the public of the opera renewed?

JC:  The public in general, not only the opera fans, understood as that part of society that consumes what the entertainment industry proposes.  People sometimes confuse art with the business of art, or sport with the business of sport; they are different things. If the money in football ends tomorrow, it does not mean that the sport is over.  People can continue to play sports.  What will not be there is soccer spectacle in which millions and millions are made.  And if the money for art is over, because sometimes people say that the crisis will end the culture, I say that the crisis will not end with the culture.  If you want culture, the libraries are there, the museums, the academies, the schools are there.  What is going to end is the art trades if there is no money.  This has to be very clear because if everything is not very black and very ugly and you can not mix things.  In a world like ours, it is an ever greater challenge to maintain interest in a human activity that binds us in some way to the past but positively.  Classical music, ballet, like sports, are activities of human beings and of culture.  The Greeks already said that sport was included in culture.  If we stop having an audience, there is no need for culture.  But while there is an audience there is a product.

Q: Has the public moved away from classical art?

JC:  It is always spoken and we fill our mouths because people will not see classical music because it is expensive, because it is only for the elite.  And that's a big lie like a house.  It is much more expensive to go to see a Real Madrid match with Barcelona than a show at La Scala in Milan.  Today we go to the Vienna Opera, we are going to talk about the outside because we like so much to look at the outside, here we have the Colón, but you can go to the Vienna theater for 16 euros, and the last minute tickets, There are some for two euros.  Just as the artists or those who run the business have to call things by their name, so the public has to do it and say I do not consume classical art because I do not like it, it bores me or I do not understand it.  And he has every right.  No, you like other things.  One thing you learn over the years and stop being so desperately passionate is to give Caesar what is Caesar's.  That's the theme and not "I do not go to the theater because it's expensive."  Classic art costs dearly because it has a march more than the little song of every day.  And that implies more of an effort than eating something in a rush.  The audience of classical art able to understand that to enjoy all the wonder that a great book, a great painting, a great symphony, it takes its time.  That investment of time in a world where everything goes so fast the classic art is more that the last moment.  The validity of something that was done 200 years ago requires getting in, getting dirty, perspiring.  And that's what costs the most.  When we talk about the fact that the public is moving away from classical art, it does not do so because it has less desire for beauty, which has less and less time, because it does not have it or because it does not want to do it.

"Andrea Chénier" in the Colón

In this return to Argentina, José Cura will star in the Teatro Colón the opera "Andrea Chénier" based on the life of a poet linked to the French Revolution. The singer said that this period is an example of how artists can be protagonists in their time.  "If there was a revolution that was the example of how far you can get supported by artists, because if they are not revolutionaries are those who warn of potential dangers with their films, books or music, this is it." Chénier was on the side of the Revolution with his writings, but when he saw that the Revolution was beginning to have a dangerous similarity with what was revealed, he also denounced it, and those who ended up cutting his head were his own friends, "he explained about this work he has already done in London , Vienna, Bologna, Japan and Barcelona.

The "commitment" of a distinction

"A fortnight ago they gave me the Onegin in Russia, which is like the Russian Oscar in music, but when the prize is at home, the weight and responsibility are different," said José Cura about the distinction given to him by the UNR. Cura, who has added international recognition throughout his almost thirty-year career, added: "Abroad has the character of honor and satisfaction for the duty fulfilled, but when it is at home a great responsibility is attached. And the applause or recognition most difficult to achieve is always that of your brothers, that of your family, that has a double cut, the pleasure of feeling recognized and respected by your brothers and the commitment.”  Cura has also been named Knight of the Order of the Cedar of Lebanon, Guest Professor of the Royal Academy of Music, honorary vice president of the Youth Opera in London, among other titles.

 

Note:  This is a machine-based translation.

José Cura uses language with precision and purpose;  the computer does not.  

We offer it only a a rough guide to the conversation and the ideas exchanged but the following should not be considered definitive.

 

 

 

 


 

 

More from St Petersburg....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 
Tosca Retrospective
 
 
 
 

Tosca, Vienna, March 2009:  “Three artists with extraordinary stage instincts shaped this noble thriller in the 525th performance of this production. José Cura is the extraordinary man familiar in illustration and from the beginning he scores points as the revolutionary and the lover, especially when facing the firing squad at the execution command, recognizing it as the consequence of the perfidy of Scarpia he had understood for a long time. The fact he proved, in defiance of his critics, that his is a still a serious singer positively rounded off his achievement of the evening. With almost sinewy stretched phrases, concentration, and brilliance in the high notes, he sang the aria and the duet in the first act with the requisite fervor, with convincing despair in the dungeon scene and hurled an ardent 'Vittoria' at the police chief.”  Der Neue Merker, 5 March 2009

 

Tosca, Wiesbaden, February 2009:  “José Cura, the Argentine-born tenor who star could not rise high enough for some fans a few years ago has recently been specializing in Gala performances like this one in Wiesbaden. In vocal terms, Cura proved to be a nearly perfect Puccini singer whose voice in piano suggests iridescent colors; in forte, a metal sound may be present. His aria in the third act (‘E lucevan le stelle’) was a trace reserved, his vocal union with Mario de Rose, guest director of the Hessischen Staatsorchester, flawless.”  Main-Rheiner, 23 February 2009

 

Tosca, Wiesbaden, February 2009:  “Finally, it was left to José Cura to provide the picture of what is expected of an excellent soloist—thanks to his ability to make the orchestra his ally.  Not for nothing does the tenor like to work with Mario de Rose, who was the guest at the state orchestra’s podium for the evening.  Instead of a saturated soundtrack, the listeners experienced adaptable playing that knew how to cover and release the voice alternately, bringing the finest nuances through sublime dynamic weighting and a hint of sound.  Puccini would have enjoyed it.”  Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

 

 

Tosca, Cologne, May 2012:  “Why Cologne Opera's new production of Tosca is attracting large audiences is a no-brainer. Puccini's "tawdry little shocker" is always a cash-cow, and on 31 May the performance boasted the extra draw of star tenor José Cura, in town for a one-night stand. A dressy crowd and lots of opera insiders showed up to be dazzled. And dazzle he did. I can't remember the last time I heard a genuine Italianate tenor sing Cavaradossi (actually Cura is from Argentina), and it was a pleasure to hear a real deal in fine voice. Hitting his stride from the start with a heartfelt ‘Recondita armonia,’ he later belted out a leonine “Vittoria!” and topped off with a theatrics-free ‘E lucevan le stelle.’ Cura is unusual among star tenors because he can act convincingly, even when he’s unfamiliar with the staging. At the same time, he was determined to sing his Cavaradossi and paid little heed to conductor and Cologne’s General Music Director Markus Stenz, who maintained the high road and graciously accommodated his guest. It's hard to sense what Stenz is making of the score, because he had his hands full keeping an ear on Cura. Nonetheless, he held the orchestra together crisply and rallied the other singers cohesively without trying to score interpretive points. While Cura appeared to be a considerate colleague to his fellow singers, some of them may have been a bit intimidated by his imposing presence.” OperaBlog, 31 May 2012

 

Tosca, Stockholm, June 2012:  “In the third act, José Cura shone. Here Cura demonstrated why he is among the world’s best tenors today.  It was a great stage experience. The third act was truly amazing, helped along of course by the vibrant Royal Orchestra led by Pier Giorgio Morandi. A completely magical experience and a truly grand finale. You have to congratulation opera director Birgitta Svendén on involving José Cura, for his involvement was enough to lift the other singers to a higher step.”  Kulturemagazinet, June 2012

 

Tosca, Stockholm, June 2012:  “If one ventures a football metaphor, it is to compare the Argentine tenor José Cura's brief and only guest performances at the Royal Opera House to Lionel Messi's playing with (Club) Hammarby in a couple of games. The first time was last Saturday; the last yesterday (Tuesday). So, if one wanted to see Cura, it's too late. And here comes one of those annoying reviews of something that it is now impossible to see. Rarely have I seen a more honest, true-hearted E lucevan le stelle,’ an aria which has been a showcase song for tenors in tails in order to please arena audiences with displays of their spectacular singing. Here is what it's about: Cavaradossi is to be executed. José Cura sits down ponderously and writes. There is no flapping of arms; there are no artificial facial expressions; there are no unnecessary props (he moves them gracefully away). There is only this man's love and despair. Cura has no need to be put into a stenographer's vise in order for us to understand that he suffers. He does it so well anyway.”  Expressen, 13 June 2012  

 

Tosca, Vienna, March 2012:  “Equally strong, the vocally muscular Cavaradossi of José Cura. He paced himself well; he sang ‘E lucevan le stelle’ without sentimentality, short-phrased and aggressive. The second act evolved into a harrowing political drama—without a doubt the strongest, most powerful moments of this show. An impressive Tosca.”  Weiner Zeitung, 20 March 2012

 

Tosca, Vienna, March 2012:  “[Early on] Jose Cura seemed on reserve.  But when it comes to being fiery, this Mario still has secure: the high notes of "Vittoria!  Vittoria "do not pose any problem, and this person of invariably burning blood is not without seductions.”  ForumOpera, 22 March 2012

 

Tosca, Vienna, March 2012:  “What amazes time and again, especially after an evening of Wagner: how much Puccini's music lives in the moment, how compact and varied these moments are, and how sensuously they are described by him. Puccini's music makes one think it's possible to drink it, to bathe in it. Wagner describes ideas, Puccini describes human beings. With verve, "vivacissimo con violenza", Welser-Möst plunged into the descending g-minor motive and focused in the course of the first two acts primarily on tension. Surprising that José Cura nonetheless succeeded more than once in overtaking the music director and the State Opera orchestra: the Argentine, all pride and vigor as always, offered the fastest Cavaradossi ever. The high piano places of the first act are glossed over swiftly; just as fast but more impressive and solid: the ‘E lucevan le stelle’ in the final act; thrilling: the moments of attack such as the 'Vittoria' shouts in the second act.”  Der Standard, 21 March 2012

 

 

Wiesbaden Gala - 2009

 

                                  

 

 

Cologne 2012

 

Stockholm 2012

 

 

      

 

 

 

Vienna 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wiesbaden Gala - 2012

 

 

    
 

 

 

 
 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

Calendar 2017

 

Month

Dates

Work

Theater

City

January

28, 31

La Bohème (production)

RSO

http://www.operan.se/in-english/

Stockholm

February

4, 7, 10, 16, 19

La Bohème (production)

RSO

http://www.operan.se/in-english/

Stockholm

 February

19, 22, 25, 28

Tannhäuser

Salle Garnier Opera de Monte Carlo

Monte Carlo

 March

8, 9

Concert:  Symphonic

(Ecco Homo)

Smetana Hall Municipal House

www.fok.cz        www.obecnidum.cz

Prague

 May

7, 10, 13, 26 

Peter Grimes (tenor, director, stage design)

Theater Bonn

Bonn

June

3, 7, 9, 12, 14

La Bohème (production)

RSO

http://www.operan.se/in-english/

Stockholm

June

16, 20, 22, 25, 27, 29

Otello

Opera royal de Wallonie 

www.operaliege.be

Liege

July

8, 15 

Peter Grimes

Theater Bonn

Bonn

 October

4, 5

Concert:  Symphonic

Smetana Hall Municipal House

www.fok.cz        www.obecnidum.cz

Prague

October

29

Concert:  Charity

Alexandrinsky Theater

St Petersburg

December

5, 10, 13. 16

Andrea Chénier

Teatro Colón

http://www.teatrocolon.org.ar/en/the-theatre

Buenos Aires

         

 

Calendar 2018

 

Month

Dates

Work

Theater

City

January

1

Concert:  New Year

 

Warsaw

February

20, 23, 25, 28

Peter Grimes

Oper de Montecarlo

Monte Carlo

 March

15, 17

Pagliacci

Royal Opera House Muscat

 Oman

 March

21, 22

Concert: Debussy / Ravel

Smetana Hall Municipal House

Prague

May

13

Recital:  Argentinean Songs

Semperoper

Dresden

June

 13, 14

Concert:  Aregntinean Songs/ Karlowicz 7th Symphony

Smetana Hall Municipal House

Prague

June

28, 29

Nabucco / Set Design / Stage Director

Prague National Theater

Prague

 July

7

Concert:  Singer / Conductor (Open Air)

Rychenbergpark

 Winterthur

July

11

Concert

Music Pavillion

Zagreb

September

21, 23

Fanciulla del west / Set Design, Stage Direction, Conductor

Tallinn Opera House

Tallinn

October

7

Concert:  Argentinean Songs / Dvorak 9th Symphony

Stadthaus

Künzelsau

October

13

Recital:  Argentinean Songs

Stadthaus

Winterthur

 

 

Resources

 

 

 

 

 

Find Cura on Wikipedia!

 

Want to know more about José Cura?  Check out his Wikipedia page (click on the photo and find out such neat things as.....

  • Full name:  José Luis Victor Cura Gómez
  • First starring role:  Bibalo's Signorina Julia, Teatro Lirico Giuseppe Verdi, Trieste, Italy, 1993
     
  • First performance in US:  Giordano's Fedora, Chicago Lyric, USA, 1994

 

 

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Last Updated:  Sunday, November 19, 2017  © Copyright: Kira